For the cause of writing

Prajwal Parajuly has been chosen writer-in-residence by Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies

Young author, Prajwal Parajuly, has been selected as the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies (OCHS) first Writer-in-Residence.

At 28, Prajwal’s first book, The Gurkha’s Daughter has been called “Crisp, inventive and insightful” by The Guardian.128prajwalS31

While at the OCHS he will be completing work on his first novel, Land Where I Flee, due for publication this year. Prajwal will also be blogging on life at the OCHS and giving public readings of his work in progress. Parajuly says, “To have the time and space to work on my own writing while simultaneously being surrounded by discourse on the religion I was born into, and about which I know little, will be a wonderful experience.”

OCHS Director, Shaunaka Rishi Das said: “When Prajwal first came to us last year, it was clear that this is a young man of prodigious talent and an enormous future. It was immediately clear that this is someone whose work we would like to foster.”

The Writer-in-Residence programme is a part of the OCHS’s Artist-in-Residence programme, which supported the work of Param Tomanec, an exceptional photographer who has since gone on to become a filmmaker. Lal Krishna, Development administrator at the OCHS says, “Parajuly will be finishing work on his first novel, Land Where I Flee, due for publication this year. He will also be blogging on life at the OCHS and giving public readings of his work in progress. We’ve long had an interest in promoting artistic expressions stemming from the subcontinent.”

Parajuly is from Sikkim, in India’s northeast. Recognised as a writer at a young age he moved to the US where he began work on The Gurkha’s Daughter. Following this he went on to complete a Masters in Creative Writing at Oxford. He has also served as Senior Editor of The Oxonian Review of Books and Senior Advertising Executive at The Village Voice.

Lal Krishna adds, “The OCHS exists to give voice to young people make sense of their heritage for a modern audience. Being an academic centre, this usually manifests in the fields of philosophy, theology, oriental studies, and other related fields. Parajuly’s work links us to the equally valuable arts.” Hopefully, there be a signing or reading at the centre soon where readers could hear Parajuly read.